Categories
Hacking Repair Tutorials Video

Repairing a Puffco Peak

Problem: Puffco Peak Does Not Charge via Micro USB Port

Our Puffco came to us defective, from a friend: it wouldn’t charge. My first task was a disassembly, which you can read about here. I determined the charging circuit in my puffco was defective, and set out to solve the problem.

I reached out on Reddit after my teardown video to see if anyone had more information. Reddit user MAXVapor710 posted this:

… The other possible scenario is a bad charge controller, which requires surface mount rework on a very small component. The Charge Controller is a Monolithic Power Systems MP2615 https://www.monolithicpower.com/en/mp2615.html

These usually get very hot when they are not working correctly, easily diagnosed with a thermal cam or a sensitive finger.

We do repair out of warranty Peaks, and offer a battery replacement service, if you have any more questions let me know or email support@maxvapor.com

MAXVapor710 – Reddit – https://www.reddit.com/r/puffco/comments/e5q2y4/opening_up_a_puffco_peak_to_fix_full_teardown/

With that information, I knew I didn’t have the right tools to do a surface mount rework of the chip.

I opted for bypassing the internal charger altogether in favour of an external third party charger. There are a few choices here, and this is one of those times where you get what you pay for.

I learned from MaxVapor that this evaluation board is the correct replacement for this hack. It uses the MP2615 and has large pads to solder to, and charges the Puffco battery the exact same way that the factory circuit that has died used to.

Option 1 (Good) – DC Wall Wart aka Dumb Charger

Do you have a bin of abandoned wall adapters in a closet somewhere? Perhaps under the stairs or in the garage? Go find it and look for an AC to DC converter rated at 7.5 volts and 1 amp. Slightly higher voltage and amperage may work, but I wanted to err on the side of caution.

One of these multi-voltage adapters should work, but again mind the specs – I don’t know what might happen if the rated amperage is too high.

Multi-volt AC-DC adapter from Amazon for around $15

If either the voltage or amperage is too high, you can damage your device and the batteries – potentially leading to a fire and a new paperweight instead of a fixed Peak. Please be careful, and only proceed if you are confident in your decision.

I only suggest this solution if for some reason you already have a AC-DC adapter of the correct specifications, or cannot acquire a smart charger.

Option 2 (Better)- Smart Charger

With a smart charger, the risk of overcharging or damaging your batteries goes down a lot. These chargers measure the voltage of the battery, adjusting the amount of energy delivered to both maximize the lifetime of the battery and the safety when doing so.

A bit fancier than the other smart charger, this will tell you more about your battery.

I use a fancy charger like the one above, but this one from Amazon should work too. You will need to make an adapter to go from the charger to the barrel connector if the charger doesn’t come with one.

This is different for every charger and whichever connector you choose to add.

Option 3 (Best) – Professional Repair

If you are considering this mod, but you aren’t confident to get it done: Consider reaching out to the folks at MaxVapor for a professional repair or parts. Puffco Parts, Service, Repair, and Upgrades by MaxVapor

A representative of Max vapor is the user who reached out on Reddit with the information about which component failed. I have no other affiliation, or business experience with them – but I recommend MaxVapor based on my limited interactions so far.

The 3D Model

3D Model I created to house the DC power jack

Based on measurements I made, this model was designed over the course of a few days. It can still be improved upon, and I will happily share my working files with anyone who requests. Grab the 3D print files from Thingiverse:

The thingiverse page has two .stl files, the second file being the bottom cap for the base.

There are a few areas that require support for printing, but your printer will be different than mine – so adjust accordingly. I printed using PLA and have not had any issues with my base in the months I’ve used it.

The screw posts in the model ended up weak in my print, and eventually snapped off. This wasn’t an issue, as the tight fit of the base cover plate allows it to snap in place easily.

The Hack

Step 1: Disassembly

You will probably want to watch my first video on how to get into the Puffco body.

Step 2: Add Wires to the Positive & Negative Pads of the Main Board

Once inside your Puffco vape, it’s a simple process of adding a positive and negative wire onto the pads found on the main board. This is done using solder and a soldering iron to make a strong electrical connection.

The red wire, coming from the battery is positive (+) and the black wire is negative (-). It’s important that you lay the wires flat against the circuit board to solder them, otherwise they will be in the way when you attempt to close the case back up.

Showing the solder points
The positive lead is pictured above, on the left by the second F & C of Puffco The negative lead is not visible in this photo

Step 3: Reassemble your Peak with Wires Sticking out the Bottom

With the wires attached to the main board, you can close the plastic back up and route the wires down through the rectangular opening that remains. Do not reinstall the fancy metal plate on the bottom of your Puffco. Store it in a safe place, you don’t need it if you’re using my .stl files for the 3D printed base.

Step 4: Attach the 3D Printed Base Using Double Sided Tape

Using some double sided foam sticky tape, you can affix the 3D printed base to the Puffco and feed the wires into the housing.

Make sure you use double sided tape that has a nice puffy foam core. My .stl files are not tight enough tolerance to get a great stick with thin double sided tape.

With the new base attached, and wires sticking out.

Step 5: Solder the DC Jack to the Wires

Again, we will use solder to connect the new wires we installed to a DC barrel jack. I used this type of low voltage barrel connector from amazon:

The style of DC jack I used from Amazon.ca

Use heat shrink around any soldered connections to prevent dangerous short-circuit conditions.

Step 6: Test Your Fixed Puffco Peak

With the DC jack connected and installed, you can test your work to see if your battery still charges. I tested mine by soldering the pack directly to the board, and plugging it in to charge – only proceeding once I verified the fix would work.

Your Puffco should charge and work again!

Categories
Apache Hacking Open Source Software

Heartbleed Affected Websites List

Source: http://mashable.com/2014/04/09/heartbleed-bug-websites-affected/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link

See my other post for more info on the Heartbleed Exploit.

Social Networks

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Change your password? What did they say?
Facebook Unclear Yes Yes “We added protections for Facebook’s implementation of OpenSSL before this issue was publicly disclosed. We haven’t detected any signs of suspicious account activity, but we encourage people to … set up a unique password.”
Instagram Yes Yes Yes “Our security teams worked quickly on a fix and we have no evidence of any accounts being harmed. But because this event impacted many services across the web, we recommend you update your password on Instagram and other sites, particularly if you use the same password on multiple sites.”
LinkedIn No No No “We didn’t use the offending implementation of OpenSSL in www.linkedin.com or www.slideshare.net. As a result, HeartBleed does not present a risk to these web properties.”
Pinterest Yes Yes Yes “We fixed the issue on Pinterest.com, and didn’t find any evidence of mischief. To be extra careful, we e-mailed Pinners who may have been impacted, and encouraged them to change their passwords.”
Tumblr Yes Yes Yes “We have no evidence of any breach and, like most networks, our team took immediate action to fix the issue.”
Twitter No Yes Unclear Twitter wrote that OpenSSL “is widely used across the internet and at Twitter. We were able to determine that [our] servers were not affected by this vulnerability. We are continuing to monitor the situation.” While reiterating that they were unaffected, Twitter told Mashable that they did apply a patch.

Other Companies

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
Apple No No No “iOS and OS X never incorporated the vulnerable software and key web-based services were not affected.”
Amazon No No No “Amazon.com is not affected.”
Google Yes Yes Yes* “We have assessed the SSL vulnerability and applied patches to key Google services.” Search, Gmail, YouTube, Wallet, Play, Apps and App Engine were affected; Google Chrome and Chrome OS were not.

*Google said users do not need to change their passwords, but because of the previous vulnerability, better safe than sorry.

Microsoft No No No Microsoft services were not running OpenSSL, according to LastPass.
Yahoo Yes Yes Yes “As soon as we became aware of the issue, we began working to fix it… and we are working to implement the fix across the rest of our sites right now.” Yahoo Homepage, Yahoo Search, Yahoo Mail, Yahoo Finance, Yahoo Sports, Yahoo Food, Yahoo Tech, Flickr and Tumblr were patched. More patches to come, Yahoo says.

Email

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
AOL No No No AOL told Mashable it was not running the vulnerable version of the software.
Gmail Yes Yes Yes* “We have assessed the SSL vulnerability and applied patches to key Google services.”

*Google said users do not need to change their passwords, but because of the previous vulnerability, better safe than sorry.

Hotmail / Outlook No No No Microsoft services were not running OpenSSL, according to LastPass.
Yahoo Mail Yes Yes Yes “As soon as we became aware of the issue, we began working to fix it… and we are working to implement the fix across the rest of our sites right now.”

Stores and Commerce

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
Amazon No No No “Amazon.com is not affected.”
Amazon Web Services (for website operators) Yes Yes Yes Most services were unaffected or Amazon was already able to apply mitigations (see advisory note here). Elastic Load Balancing, Amazon EC2, Amazon Linux AMI, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Ubuntu, AWS OpsWorks, AWS Elastic Beanstalk and Amazon CloudFront were patched.
eBay No No No “eBay.com was never vulnerable to this bug because we were never running a vulnerable version of OpenSSL.”
Etsy Yes* Yes Yes Etsy said that only a small part of its infrastructure was vulnerable, and they have patched it.
GoDaddy Yes Yes Yes “We’ve been updating GoDaddy services that use the affected OpenSSL version.” Full Statement
Groupon No No No “Groupon.com does not utilize a version of the OpenSSL library that is susceptible to the Heartbleed bug.”
Nordstrom No No No “Nordstrom websites do not use OpenSSL encryption.”
PayPal No No No “Your PayPal account details were not exposed in the past and remain secure.” Full Statement
Target No No No “[We] launched a comprehensive review of all external facing aspects of Target.com… and do not currently believe that any external-facing aspects of our sites are impacted by the OpenSSL vulnerability.”
Walmart No No No “We do not use that technology so we have not been impacted by this particular breach.”

Videos, Photos, Games & Entertainment

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
Flickr Yes Yes Yes “As soon as we became aware of the issue, we began working to fix it… and we are working to implement the fix across the rest of our sites right now.”
Hulu No No No No comment provided.
Minecraft Yes Yes Yes “We were forced to temporary suspend all of our services. … The exploit has been fixed. We can not guarantee that your information wasn’t compromised.” More Information
Netflix Yes Yes Yes “Like many companies, we took immediate action to assess the vulnerability and address it. We are not aware of any customer impact. It’s a good practice to change passwords from time to time, now would be a good time to think about doing so. “
SoundCloud Yes Yes Yes SoundCloud emphasized that there were no indications of any foul play and that the company’s actions were simply precautionary.
YouTube Yes Yes Yes* “We have assessed the SSL vulnerability and applied patches to key Google services.”

*Google said users do not need to change their passwords, but because of the previous vulnerability, better safe than sorry.

Banks and Brokerages

All the banks we contacted (see below) said they were unaffected by Heartbleed, but U.S. regulators have warned banks to patch their systems.

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
Bank of America No No No “A majority of our platforms do NOT use OpenSSL, and the ones that do, we have confirmed no vulnerabilities.”
Barclays No No No No comment provided.
Capital One No No No “Capital One uses a version of encryption that is not vulnerable to Heartbleed.”
Chase No No No “These sites don’t use the encryption software that is vulnerable to the Heartbleed bug.”
Citigroup No No No Citigroup does not use Open SSL in “customer-facing retail banking and credit card sites and mobile apps”
E*Trade No No No E*Trade is still investigating.
Fidelity No No No “We have multiple layers of security in place to protect our customer sites and services.”
PNC No No No “We have tested our online and mobile banking systems and confirmed that they are not vulnerable to the Heartbleed bug.”
Schwab No No No “Efforts to date have not detected this vulnerability on Schwab.com or any of our online channels.”
Scottrade No No No “Scottrade does not use the affected version of OpenSSL on any of our client-facing platforms.”
TD Ameritrade No No No TD Ameritrade “doesn’t use the versions of openSSL that were vulnerable.”
TD Bank No No No “We’re currently taking precautions and steps to protect customer data from this threat and have no reason to believe any customer data has been compromised in the past.”
T. Rowe Price No No No “The T. Rowe Price websites are not vulnerable to the “Heartbleed” SSL bug nor were they vulnerable in the past.”
U.S. Bank No No No “We do not use OpenSSL for customer-facing, Internet banking channels, so U.S. Bank customer data is NOT at risk.”
Vanguard No No No “We are not using, and have not used, the vulnerable version of OpenSSL.”
Wells Fargo No No No No reason provided.

Government and Taxes

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
1040.com No No No “We’re not vulnerable to the Heartbleed bug, as we do not use OpenSSL.”
FileYour Taxes.com No No No “We continuously patch our servers to keep them updated. However, the version we use was not affected by the issue, so no action was taken.”
H&R Block No No No “We are reviewing our systems and currently have found no risk to client data from this issue.”
Healthcare .gov No No No “Healthcare.gov consumer accounts are not affected by this vulnerability.”
Intuit (TurboTax) No No No Turbotax wrote that “engineers have verified TurboTax is not affected by Heartbleed.” The company has issued new certificates anyway, and said it’s not “proactively advising” users to change their passwords.
IRS No No No “The IRS continues to accept tax returns as normal … and systems continue operating and are not affected by this bug. We are not aware of any security vulnerabilities related to this situation.”
TaxACT No No No “Customers can update their passwords at any time, although we are not proactively advising them to do so at this time.”
USAA Yes Yes Yes USAA said that it has “already taken measures to help prevent a data breach and implemented a patch earlier this week.”

Other

WordPress

Unclear

Unclear

Unclear

WordPress tweeted that it has taken “immediate steps” and “addressed the Heartbleed OpenSSL exploit,” but it’s unclear if the issue is completely solder. When someone asked Matt Mullenweg, WordPress’ founding developer, when the site’s SSL certificates will be replaced and when users will be able to reset passwords, he simply answered: “soon.”

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
Box Yes Yes Yes “We’re currently working with our customers to proactively reset passwords and are also reissuing new SSL certificates for added protection.”
Dropbox Yes Yes Yes On Twitter: “We’ve patched all of our user-facing services & will continue to work to make sure your stuff is always safe.”
Evernote No No No “Evernote’s service, Evernote apps, and Evernote websites … all use non-OpenSSL implementations of SSL/TLS to encrypt network communications.” Full Statement
GitHub Yes Yes Yes GitHub said it has patched all its systems, deployed new SSL certificates and revoked old ones. GitHub is asking all users to change password, enable two-factor authentication and “revoke and recreate personal access and application tokens.”
IFTTT Yes Yes Yes IFTTT emailed all its users and logged them out, prompting them to change their password on the site.
OKCupid Yes Yes Yes “We, like most of the Internet, were stunned that such a serious bug has existed for so long and was so widespread.”
Spark Networks (JDate, Christian Mingle) No No No Sites do not use OpenSSL.
SpiderOak Yes Yes No Spideroak said it patched its servers, but the desktop client doesn’t use a vulnerable version of OpenSSL, so “customers do not need to take any special action.”
Wunderlist Yes Yes Yes “You’ll have to simply log back into Wunderlist. We also strongly recommend that you reset your password for Wunderlist.” Full Statement

Password Managers

Was it affected? Is there a patch? Do you need to change your password? What did they say?
1Password No No No 1Password said in a blog post that its technology “is not built upon SSL/TLS in general, and not upon OpenSSL in particular.” So users don’t need to change their master password.
Dashlane Yes Yes No Dashlane said in a blog post users’ accounts were not impacted and the master password is safe as it is never transmitted. The site does use OpenSSL when syncing data with its servers but Dashlane said it has patched the bug, issued new SSL certificates and revoked previous ones.
LastPass Yes Yes No “Though LastPass employs OpenSSL, we have multiple layers of encryption to protect our users and never have access to those encryption keys.” Users don’t need to change their master passwords because they’re never sent to the server. But passwords for other sites stored in LastPass might need to be changed.
Categories
Apache Hacking Software

OpenSSL’s New Vulnerability – Are Your SSL Keys Safe?

The Heartbleed Bug – has potentially compromised up to 66% of web servers.

TL;DR XKCD

Researchers at Google and a private security firm Codenomicon have a revealed a new vulnerability in the OpenSSL security used by Apache and nginx Web servers. These technologies are so popular, that this issue – dubbed the Heartbleed Bug – has potentially compromised up to 66% of web servers. Noting that these vulnerabilities have been gaping open for nearly two years, as of the 1.0.1g release of OpenSSL. This has left many websites vulnerable, with no way of knowing whether their private keys were compromised during this window.

The Heartbleed bug is not a man-in-the-middle attack. It exploit’s OpenSSL’s handling of TLS’s heartbeat, which is an encrypted portion of the connection. The reason it leaves no traces is not because it can’t be detected, but because it’s just not logged by OpenSSL. Theoretically it could be logged, though there may be too many false positives that diminish any usefulness logging would have.

Attackers apparently also have control (or at least influence) over what 64KB of memory they can capture, and can keep requesting more memory with each heartbeat (so the 64KB limit isn’t that limiting).

Without using any privileged information or credentials we were able steal from ourselves the secret keys used for our X.509 certificates, user names and passwords, instant messages, emails and business critical documents and communication. -Codenomicon

Heartbeat can be disabled in OpenSSL, but only via a recompile – in which case you might as well apply the new patch anyways.

Sources:

http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/04/critical-crypto-bug-in-openssl-opens-two-thirds-of-the-web-to-eavesdropping/

https://blog.torproject.org/blog/openssl-bug-cve-2014-0160

http://blog.existentialize.com/diagnosis-of-the-openssl-heartbleed-bug.html

Categories
Hacking Quick Tips Software Tutorials

Stop Youtube from Asking to Use Your Real Name

UPDATE: Unfortunately, this doesn’t quite work anymore.

So you’re sick and tired of Youtube’s popup asking, “Do you want to use your real name with your Youtube channel?” No? How about the part where when you check ‘no’ and are greeted with, “Okay, we’ll ask you again later.

Here’s my quick tip to keeping your Google account separate from your otherwise anonymous Youtube account.

For this you will need a modern browser like Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc. (which you should have anyways… please?) and the Ad-Block Plus Extension. It’s simple as far as implementation and will only take a minute after you’ve installed the extension.

How To

Going into your Ad Block Plus settings by right clicking on icon will open a dialog.

ad-block_Chrome

Go to the custom filter list in the options panel and select, “Manually edit filters” and add the line: ||s.ytimg.com/yts/jsbin/www-linkgplusdialog*

Click for a larger view.
Click for a larger view.

Don’t forget to add the “||” as they act as a catch all for http://, https://, and www prefix, which saves you from making three or four rules for one blocking.

Bonus: Block Video Annotations

||youtube.com/annotations_invideo*
Adding the line above to your custom filters will hide annotations in all Youtube videos, even while logged out.

Categories
Apple Hacking iPhone Jailbreaking Software Tutorials

Untethered Jailbreak with “evasi0n – iOS 6.0-6.1.2 Jailbreak” on a Windows PC

Jailbreaking iPhones is nothing new, nearly any and all handheld apple devices have had a crack of some sort available since  2007. Software based cracks started popping up in 2008, with a lot of the early work being done by George Hotz.

The actual jailbreak process is extremely straightforward. Only a few steps are required…

We’ve come a long way since the early days, with the ability to jailbreak in under five minutes, as well as with a one click solution through your iOS device’s browser. Despite the ease of use, the more recent iterations of the iPhone have closed the security breach that allowed for websites like www.jailbreakme.com to work. For that reason, I’ll be using the evasi0n – iOS 6.0-6.1.2 Jailbreak to free an iPhone 4 16gb running OS 6.0.1 baseband 01.59.00*. The phone is carrier locked and the owner will be leaving for Europe shortly, and they need an internationally functioning phone.

download_evasi0n_jailbreak

Preparing to Jailbreak

There are a few requirements before you can begin unlocking an iOS device with the Evasion Jailbreak.

  1. You need a suitable machine to perform the jailbreak with, supported operating systems include: Windows, Linux, and Mac OS.
  2. iTunes needs to be installed on your computer of choice.
  3. Your iOS device needs to be updated to at least iOS 6.0
  4. You need to have downloaded the Jailbreak executable, available here.
  5. An extraction tool to get the files from the download, I suggest WinRAR by RARLAB.
  6. You should back up any device before you jailbreak, should something go wrong.

Jailbreaking Process

The actual jailbreak process is extremely straightforward. Only a few steps are required to successfully jailbreak you iOS device using the evasi0n jailbreak.

Requirements

Ensure you meet all of the requirements listed above. Install iTunes, backup your iOS device (iPhone 4 in this case), and download the jailbreak tool.

Extract

Extract the executable file to your desktop (or wherever is convenient) for later use.
Extract the executable file by dragging and dropping onto your desktop (or wherever is convenient) for later use.

Connect

Connect your iPhone or other Apple iOS device to your computer via usb/proprietary connector. Ensure your computer recognizes that your device is plugged in.

Run

jailbreaking-process-zachary-melo

From this point forward, we will not be touching iTunes or the iPhone until explicitly told to do so. Double click on the evasi0n icon that you’ve extracted and allow the program to run (if a dialog box appears). You will see the image above (less the bits about being jailbroken already), and if you read carefully – you’ll see that evasi0n is already scanning your phone’s software to see if it’s compatible. If everything is good, you can proceed with the one-click install of the jailbreak. Simply click on the button to the right and let the program do it’s thing.

In about five minutes you will be prompted to unlock and press a new icon on your apple device. After doing so, the device will power cycle several times. At this time, you can boot up Cydia App manager, which will again reboot your system. Cydia allows you to install third party applications on your Apple device, you are now free to download unapproved apps and tweaks not officially approved by Apple. This includes the tool we’ll be using to break our carrier sim-lock.

Carrier Sim Unlocking

UltraSn0w

Open Cydia and tap on the Search icon, and search for UltraSn0w – download and install this package. From here we will need to add an additional repository to our Cydia application. To do this we:

  1. Open Cydia’s home page by closing and opening the app
  2. Tap on the Manage icon found in the bottom bar
  3. Tap on the Sources button in the middle of the screen
  4. Tap on the Edit button found in the top right hand corner of your screen
  5. Click on the Add button that appears in the top left of the screen
  6. Type into the text box, http://repo.iparelhos.com”
  7. Tap the Add Source button
  8. Once the operation completes, tap the Return to Cydia button found at the bottom of your screen (you may have to scroll)

Go back to your Cydia home screen and pull up the search function again by tapping the Search icon found in the bottom right corner of the screen. Search for Ultrasn0w Fixer for your OS version, and install this application. In my case, I’ll be using the Ultrasnow Fixer for 6.0.1.

That’s all, you should be unlocked and ready to go. If this doesn’t work, chances are your baseband version is too recent. If that’s the case, you’ll have to visit http://www.unlockboot.com/2012/10/jailbreak-ios-6-iphone-4-iphone-3gs.html for a tutorial on how to use RedSn0w.